Author Archive for Dave Braun

What to Know for a Successful Website Design Part 6

Welcome to Part 6 of our 6-lesson crash course on What to Know for a Successful Website Design!

In Part 1 you learned that the one big mistake almost everyone makes is…your website is NOT for you; it’s for your customers! Thus, your website must appeal to them so that they will do whatever action you want them to do.

In Part 2 you learned what the six main steps were to designing or redesigning your website.

(Don’t forget to grab our checklists on either of those two posts.)

In Part 3 you learned that your budget is your MOST important decision in this process.

In Part 4 you learned about what you really should and should NOT be working on.

In Part 5 we discussed the importance of Visual appeal and Copywriting.

In our final installment, we’re going to discuss the final two steps in the process: Implementation and Maintenance/Security.

 

Implementation

Just like a house has to be built first with a foundation, followed by framing and implementation of the house systems (electrical, ducting, plumbing), putting up the walls, and then the finish work (painting, faucets, etc.), there is a structure to your website.

The foundation is really the Content Management System (CMS) on which the website is built.

There are several CMS’s available (WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, etc.), as well as custom website builders (Wordflirt’s custom builder, Wix, etc.)

The CMS’s are the most flexible while the custom website builders work well but have their limitations.

As mentioned previously, you can go here to determine which is best for you: https://wordflirt.com/choosing-your-website-platform/.

Make sure you’re comfortable with how they will do it, and that you’re confident the solution chosen is fast, stable, secure, is easy to navigate on all sizes of devices, and tells your story structurally well.

One area you’ll definitely need to handle on your own are the disclaimers – privacy policy, refund policy, etc. While we can suggest some templates, it’s smart to have a legal team review them.

Maintenance and Security

In the process of building the house, to keep it as secure and maintainable as possible, you’d have several items at the entry points:

  • An alarm system
  • Strong doors, windows, and locks
  • Security cameras with motion detection
  • Automatic light timers

Similarly, with a website, you’ll need to make sure all entry points are as secure as possible. This includes

  • Secure Passwords
  • Anti-virus on any user’s computer that has access to your site so passwords aren’t stolen
  • Regular updates on your computer
  • Firewalls to protect against malware injection into your site
  • Limitation of login attempts
  • Monitoring software on your site
  • Ideally, two-factor authentication
  • Off-site backups just in case
  • SSL to ensure data is encrypted in transit

And of course, all of those systems, in both your house and on your website, must have regular maintenance or else they will break down over time.

Your house needs painting, gardening/trimming, insect management, plumbing unclogged, lights replaced, etc.

And that costs regular money.

Again, similarly, your website needs maintenance to keep the software up-to-date to protect against hackers.

Wordflirt provides the following features as part of its WordPress maintenance package:

  • Traffic Analytics monitoring so you know how much and from where it’s coming
  • Uptime monitoring
  • Monthly plugin, themes, and WordPress updates
  • Daily backups stored offsite on Amazon
  • Multi-point security lockdown procedure to guard against repeated login and brute-force attacks
  • And more…

The business builder package offers

  • Hosting on the industry-leading Amazon Cloud.
  • SSL certificates
  • Site backups
  • Global CDN to reduce load times
  • Traffic Analytics

Ok, now you’ve completed this in-depth series on all of the things you need to think about when designing or redesigning your website – WAY TO GO!

If you’re interested in getting a quote from us, please visit https://wordflirt.com/scope-document/.

Or if you just want to talk to us about website design or social media, just head to our contact page and choose whichever form of communication is best for you: https://wordflirt.com/contact-us/.

By the way, here are the links to the downloads you’ve previously received, and also this entire course in one document:

Wordflirt Website Design/Redesign Planner

Checklist of items to get a quote from a website designer or company

Checklist of questions you should ask your website designer or company

 

What to Know for a Successful Website Design Part 5

Welcome to Part 5 of our 6-lesson crash course on What to Know for a Successful Website Design!

In Part 1 you learned that the one big mistake almost everyone makes is…your website is NOT for you; it’s for your customers! Thus, your website must appeal to them so that they will do whatever action you want them to do.

In Part 2 you learned what the six main steps were to designing or redesigning your website.

(Don’t forget to grab our checklists on either of those two posts.)

In Part 3 you learned that your budget is your MOST important decision in this process.

In Part 4 you learned about what you really should and should NOT be working on.

In this lesson, we’re going to talk about the Visual appeal and the importance of Copywriting.

Visual Look and Feel

Let’s assume at this point you’ve figured out your budget and you’ve hired someone to design your website.

If you can communicate the story of what you’re trying to do to your designer and are able to help them understand your target market, the most important two things you can do are:

  • Provide examples of sites you DON’T like and what you DON’T like about them.
  • Provide examples of sites you DO like and what you DO like about them.

Now if you don’t have a clue on what you like or don’t like, do the following:

  1. Research competitors in your space.
  2. Find out which ones are the most successful and unsuccessful.
  3. See what their websites are like.
  4. Look at other industries that are totally unrelated to you and check out their websites.
    1. You can do a google search for “best-designed websites” or something like that, and it will turn up people that have made a list of their favorite sites.

You can also ask the website designer for some examples that he or she might like in that area. Often times, they are familiar with a company that does a “top 10 website” list of a certain area and will go through those for inspiration. For example, the Elegant Themes blog sometimes has those lists – here is one: Elegant Themes.

From those examples, a good designer will be able to incorporate images you have (the more professional images you have the better) and/or find images for you. They should know that a good picture is worth a thousand words, and a great picture will help draw the user into the website experience.

They will also be able to suggest the proper typography (fonts, spacings, etc.) for your site.

The story you want to communicate will also be reflected in the layout, and a good designer will suggest the best approach for this, while also considering your social media channels.

Furthermore, communicating what you DON’T like is just as important, and sometimes is easier for you to discover.

Why?

Ever been with a group of friends and someone asks where do you want to go to dinner? Or your kids? You say, “Well, how about we go to Subway?” What’s the response sometimes? “No, I don’t want a sandwich.” “OK then, how about Italian food?” “OK but I just went to an Italian place last night.”

You get the picture here; it’s easier to say what we don’t like than what we do like. So sometimes we have to narrow down from there.

So tell your website designer that you don’t like a site’s busyness, or that the font is too small, or the colors just don’t match, or you like site A but you don’t like the footer area.

All of this gives important direction and clues to your designer.

Because the more specific you are in how you do this, the faster the designer will produce something you like and will require fewer iterations, saving you time.

Copywriting

Let’s go back to the house example in our previous articles…think about the process a prospective buyer goes through. It might be something like this:

  • Hear about the house somehow (see an advertisement, friend, search)
  • Visit the house

Now once they visit the house, they

  • See the house from the curb (the outside, the lawn, etc.)
  • Open up the front door and see the entry-way and the living and/or dining room.
  • Walk through that and see the kitchen.
  • Check out a bathroom or two, and/or see the downstairs bathrooms.
  • Go upstairs and scout around the rooms up there.
  • If they like what they see, they will contact the seller or agent.

If the “curb appeal” isn’t very good, you’ll have planted in their mind negative thoughts, and in fact, they may just drive on past and not even go inside. Then once they are inside, they may not visit all the rooms or go upstairs if they don’t see what they like.

It’s the same with your website:

  • They hear about your site somehow
  • Visit your site

Now once they are on your site, they

  • See the hero area and text, which is generally the portion they first see when looking at your site (your curb appeal).
  • Scroll down the page (enter your front door).
  • Check out the other pages on your site (the rooms in your house).
  • If they like what they see and read, they will contact you somehow, either through a contact form filled out, a phone call, an email, or optin for a freebie download.

Just as with your house you are careful what “message” is given, on your website, you also must be careful what message is given.

That is where copywriting comes in.

According to Copyblogger, “Copywriting is the art and science of strategically delivering words (whether written or spoken) that get people to take some form of action.”

And that’s what you want people to do when they visit your website. TAKE ACTION!

Communication is critical so that people want to take action from the words and images you use on your site.

Thus, the website designer or company you hire should be able to help you communicate that information effectively, through colors, images, layout, and text.

That’s it for this lesson!

In part 6, our final part of the series, we’ll look at the Implementation of your website, as well as Hosting, Maintenance, and Security.

 

What to Know for a Successful Website Design Part 4

Welcome to Part 4 of our 6-lesson crash course on What to Know for a Successful Website Design!

In Part 1 you learned that the one big mistake almost everyone makes is…your website is NOT for you; it’s for your customers! Thus, your website must appeal to them so that they will do whatever action you want them to do.

In Part 2 you learned what the six main steps were to designing or redesigning your website.

(Don’t forget to grab our checklists on either of those two posts.)

In Part 3 you learned that your budget is your MOST important decision in this process.

In this post, we’re going to discuss the importance of What you really should and should NOT be working on.

Whom you hire is the second most important decision, just slightly less important than your budget.

However, the person(s) or company you select, or even the do-it-yourself tool, will be the MOST important factor in your overall experience that you have throughout the entire process.

Now first of all, we do NOT recommend you doing your own website. Why?

Not too long ago, a business, that’s now our client, had a MAJOR problem with their website.

It was down for more than two days!

The hosting company got hit with a denial of service attack that took them awhile to resolve. Way too long, unfortunately.

The business lost time, had a lot of stress, lost revenue, lost traffic, lost goodwill, etc. You get the point.

Almost all of the angst they went through could have been avoided with proper design and maintenance.

And this is just one story.

If you’re serious about your business, you should NOT create, maintain and secure your own website by yourself. Do NOT design your own website! Unless you don’t care about poor design practices, improper maintenance, or low security on your portal that presents you to over 4 billion people.

Specifically then, here are three reasons why you should NOT design your own website:

1. You won’t optimize it properly when you design your own website

While you might be very good with design, maintenance, security, etc., you won’t know all the best practices. Even after thousands of hours of webinars, training, creation of websites, and studying, we are still learning on a daily basis – the world of the internet keeps changing. What looked good last year looks old today.

And furthermore, areas that require some skill for optimization are:

Speed. What are the best practices to be sure your website has a minimal footprint, that your pages load fast, which leads to higher rankings? How do you even find this out? According to this article on kissmetrics blog, 47% of consumers expect a web page to load in 2 seconds or less, and 40% of people abandon a website that takes more than 3 seconds to load. While there are times when loading slower is OK, ideally you want it to be fast.

Proper hosting. If you use cheap hosting, you’re on a shared plan and you don’t know how many other folks are sharing that server today, let alone tomorrow. If one of the people that shares your server has a spike in traffic, your site will load slow, and people will not wait around.

SEO. The best Search Engine Optimization is done through keyword research, applying those keywords throughout your site (titles, descriptions, images, etc.), monitoring, and tweaking. Some basic work can be done rather easily; however, monitoring of results and performing tweaks are important.

Backup and Security. Proper backup, both onsite and offsite, can keep you independent of total reliance on one hosting company. Now even the best hosting companies go down from time to time, but if you have offline backups (and your domain hosting is separate from your web hosting – this is really important to do), if your hosting company goes down or somehow cancels your account mistakenly, you can recover and have minimal downtime. Preventing hack attempts from infiltrating your site is required, as bots and bad people are trying to get into your website to take it over, or at a minimum, to upload their code, execute it, and steal your computing resources. And if something does happen, knowing what to do is vital to keeping your site online.

2. You won’t maintain it properly when you design your own website.

Again, several best practices must be stated:

Security risks. Both prevention AND monitoring are needed. Understanding who and where hack attempts are coming from can lessen the chances of something happening in the future. And of course, vulnerabilities in the various modules and plugins being used on your site does happen. Without regular maintenance, you’re taking a serious risk, and it’s even possible google can de-list you (See this article about the soaksoak malware attack on a popular plugin).

Bloat. Over time, your database can grow with draft posts, many unused revisions, images that aren’t used anywhere, etc. Keeping your site clean is important for speed, security, and maintainability.

Updating of internal links. Linking internally on your website helps with SEO, and also keeps a visitor on your site longer, exploring it more and more. It’s important to update links from one page to another often.

It will go stale. Design preferences are changing and it’s important to your branding to have your site appear modern and up-to-date.

3. You need to spend time on other things and not design your own website.

There are hundreds of things a business owner must do; designing, creating, and maintaining a website should not be one of them.

Figure out what only YOU can work on to grow your business, do that, and hire or offload the rest.

Here’s a short list of things you should be concentrating on:

  • Marketing
  • Sales
  • Content creation
  • New product definitions/creation
  • Testing your offers
  • Talking to your clients
  • Strategizing with your team on how to grow your business
  • Improving your leadership capability to help get more out of your team and improve their satisfaction.

When it comes to your health, you should consult a doctor. Yes, educate yourself to ask the right questions, but leave what’s important in the hands of an expert.

Likewise, when it comes to your website, you should consult with an expert, and use the learnings from these lessons and our checklists to educate yourself to ask the right questions.

In part 4, we’ll take an in-depth look the visual look-and-feel of your site and the importance of Copywriting.

 

What to Know for a Successful Website Design Part 3

Welcome to Part 3 of our 6-lesson crash course on What to Know for a Successful Website Design!

In Part 1 you learned that the one big mistake almost everyone makes is…your website is NOT for you; it’s for your customers! Thus, your website must appeal to them so that they will do whatever action you want them to do.

In Part 2 you learned what the six main steps were to designing or redesigning your website.

You can get our checklists on either of those two posts.

In this post, we’re going to dive into one of those six main steps:

Your Budget.

Just like when planning to build a house, this is one of the first things you must consider. Because it will cost you money.

And this is your most important decision! Because your budget will dictate the level of professional quality and experience you get.

Choosing Uncle Fred to build your house might work out OK and cost you less, but there will be some drawbacks along the way. Just be aware of those, and we discuss those in the next section.

You can search online for what a site will really cost, but you must allocate money for:

  • design (normally a one-time cost)
  • domain name registration, email, hosting, maintenance, backups, and security (normally a monthly cost)

A good website design company knows the best hosts on the market and may provide private servers optimized for their environment and clients. They will also provide a solution that ensures your site is maintained properly. Note that even Microsoft and Apple have operating system updates that you must keep up with to remain stable and secure, and your website will be no different.

More on that in later lessons.

Additionally, the limitations you impose on your budget will be the limitations you impose on the customization available for your website.

But please consider this really important fact:

Your website is your communication portal to over 4 BILLION PEOPLE!

In fact, according to this article, in 2000 there were 738 million in 2000, 3.2 billion in 2015, and now the latest internet stats, as of December 2017, show 4.1 billion users!

Therefore, consider this: if you go cheap on your website, you go cheap on your business.

We can spend $20K and up on a car, but we balk at spending a few thousand on something that’s our 365/24/7 salesperson that takes zero breaks and can be seen by billions of people.

  • Think about the value increase to your business if just ONE new person per month sees your website and wants to hire you for your services or purchase your product.

However, we at Wordflirt understand economic realities, and that’s why we have two options:

  • If you’re starting out, it may be sufficient to have a basic website that has contact forms and a way for you to tell people about you. We at Wordflirt provide an option that is very affordable and lets you use your time to build your business instead of your website. We have more information on that here: https://wordflirt.com/business-website-portfolio/
  • A custom site based on the most popular Content Management System (CMS), WordPress. It powers over 30% of all websites and is easy for our clients to use to post new content. We have more information on that here: https://wordflirt.com/wordpress-portfolio/

If it’s hard for you to choose, you can look at our portfolio, or go here to see what might be best for you: https://wordflirt.com/choosing-your-website-platform/

So you can see that before you engage with any design company, you should figure out what your budget will be. It will dictate so many things.

In part 4, we’re going to discuss the importance of what you really should and should NOT be working on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What to Know for a Successful Website Design Part 2

Welcome to Part 2 of our 6-lesson crash course on What to Know for a Successful Website Design!

In Part 1 you learned that the one big mistake almost everyone makes is…your website is NOT for you; it’s for your customers! Thus, your website must appeal to them so that they will do whatever action you want them to do.

If you happened to miss that lesson, click here to go back to it.

In this post, we’re going to dive into the main steps you need to know when designing or redesigning your website.

Oh, before we forget, if you haven’t gotten them yet, here are links to the checklist documents you’ll need to have:

Checklist of items to get a quote from a website designer or company

Checklist of questions you should ask your website designer or company

If we continue with the analogy of a house, now that you’re thinking about what the buyer (your customer/client) wants, and have an idea what that is, you’d build the house roughly in this order:

  • Understand the story your house is going to tell (large or small yard, multiple or single-story, Victorian, or modern, etc.).
    • You’ve really got to ensure the story is told well enough that the buyer envisions themselves in the house, fulfilling their hopes and dreams. In other words, that story really needs to make THEM the hero, not you.
    • For example, you can mention the termite-proof fencing, but you better talk more about how that benefits them. Something like “termite-proof fencing so that you can spend your time with your family, not maintaining your house!”
  • Be able to articulate that story enough so you can communicate it to the architect and the people marketing your house.
  • Hire an architect and develop the plans that will produce what you’re looking for.
  • Hire a contractor/builder to build it out with the proper materials to keep it secure, safe, stable, and looking good.

And for a website, you’d do something very similar:

  • Understand the story your website is going to tell (give up their email address, purchase your product, hire you as a consultant, fill out your contact form, etc.).
    • And similar to above, what is going to be the fantastic benefit to THEM by doing so.
  • Provide enough information to the company designing or redesigning your website so they can help you communicate that story via your site, with words and images, such that your client takes action, and does so with enthusiasm. In other words, you want the Call-To-Action (CTA) to be very clear to them
  • Hire a designer and copywriter as needed, or a website design company such as Wordflirt, to develop the plans.
  • Hire a website company to build it out and to maintain it, keeping it secure, safe, stable, and looking good.

And if you’re redesigning the house or updating the look and feel, you’d want to follow a similar process.

So assuming you have a good understanding of what your client wants, and what they will pay you for, here are the main areas you’re going to need to be very clear on for your site if you want it to be successful:

  1. Your budget
  2. Whom you hire
  3. The visual look and feel (images, colors, layout)
  4. The copywriting (what words are said – we’ve already alluded to some of that above)
  5. The implementation (what Content Management System to use)
  6. The maintenance and security

In part 3, we’ll learn about your budget and why it’s so important, and some ways to get a quick estimate of what you’ll need to put aside.

 

What to Know for a Successful Website Design Part 1

Welcome to Part 1 of our 6-lesson crash course on What to Know for a Successful Website Design!

The goal for this course is to provide you with what you need to know when you’re considering any type of design or redesign of your website so that your experience is as easy and fun as possible.

And today, we will start with a look at the biggest mistake almost EVERY business or individual makes with their website.

But first, let me get the checklists you’ll need as you go through the process:

Checklist of items to get a quote from a website designer or company

Checklist of questions you should ask your website designer or company

Now, whether you’re designing your website yourself, having a friend do it or partnering with a professional web design company like Wordflirt, you’ll need to have these items from the checklist handy.

You’ve heard the old adage, “Garbage In, Garbage Out”? This is used to express the idea that in computing and other spheres, incorrect or poor quality input will always produce faulty output. In other words, the quality of your input will determine the quality of your output (which is the end result).

So for a great result, you’re going to need to be clear on the requirements up front; the clearer and better thought out things are up front, the better the design and entire process will turn out.

We’re going to tell you what you need to look for, have prepared, and what you can kinda ignore.

Now here is the one big mistake that is made all of the time. It’s so common and so tempting to continue to make this mistake, and in all fields and endeavors, that we must be reminded of it on a regular basis.

And that is, in almost all cases, YOUR PRODUCT OR SERVICE IS NOT FOR YOU – IT’S FOR THE CUSTOMER!

  • the Apollo spacecraft was built by engineers, but it wasn’t designed for them – it was for the astronauts
  • all of the audio players before the iPod wasn’t built for the everyday music lover who’s not tech-savvy, and that’s where they made their mistake.

Similarly, YOUR WEBSITE SHOULD NOT BE BUILT FOR YOU – IT SHOULD BE BUILT FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS!

That is the one big mistake almost everyone makes when it comes to designing and then redesigning their website.

Therefore, you need to understand your customers: their desires, needs, wants, emotions, etc. In fact, Brian Sher, in What Rich People Know & Desperately Want To Keep Secret, states that Marketing is identifying, addressing, and answering your customer’s needs, putting yourself in their shoes.

And here’s why….

Because you want the people that visit your website to engage with you on your site. To know you, your products, your services, in a way they can understand, and that is appealing to them.

Here is a good analogy that we’ll use throughout the course.

Think about your website as you building a house that you’re going to sell to someone else. The house that you design must appeal to them – it must tell a story…when they walk up to it, you want them to be able to picture themselves living inside of it, raising a family, holding parties, etc.

Which means, to sell your house, you must understand your buyer.

In the same way, your website needs to tell a story about your product or service such that they take the action you want them to take, such as give up their email address, purchase your product, hire you as a consultant, fill out your contact form, etc.

And it’s not about you…it’s about the buyer. Your goal is to sell the house to THEM, not to you. Your personal tastes and desires might represent the part of the market you’re reaching, but then again it might not.

They must be the hero of the story, not you. You might be great and awesome, which is important, but it’s not the main thing!

So as we get into the details, that’s the frame of mind for you to be in:

YOUR WEBSITE IS NOT FOR YOU, IT’S FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS AND CLIENTS!

OK, we’re going off on a slight tangent. It’s something to keep in mind for your messaging.

What makes people want to give you money?

People (customers) will give you money only as a means of getting whatever it is they want. This means your starting point must be understanding what they want.

People will only pay you or enrich you if you closely meet their needs and desires, or remove their frustrations, fears, or concerns.

In general, people will pay you if you can do any of these better than anyone else:

  • Make or save them money
  • Save them time
  • Supply them with food, shelter, or clothing
  • Provide them with security, safety, or comfort
  • Offer them leisure or entertainment, affection, friendship, or belonging
  • Give them status, prestige, or self-respect
  • Add value to their lives

So ask questions such as:

– Can I offer a better, fresher, quicker, cheaper, hotter, colder, tastier, safer, warmer, smarter, more durable, more comfortable, more prestigious, more enjoyable, more relaxing, less stressful, healthier, improved, higher quality product or service than anyone else?

Make sure this information is contained somewhere on your website, preferably at the beginning.

Got it?

Your homework is to make sure you understand your clients – their hopes, dreams, needs, wants, desires, what keeps them up at night, what they want to feel like, etc.

In part 2 we’ll be delving into the main steps for building or redesigning your website.

 

WordPress Website Makeover Customer Highlight: vihlene.com

Wordflirt Client

Vern Vihlene Personal Website

Not long ago we finished the updates to Vern Vihlene’s upgraded personal website, at vihlene.com. Like many entrepreneurs, he has multiple businesses and ventures. The difference is he realizes how important his personal brand is; businesses may come and go, but you’ll always be you!

Vern focuses on producing high-quality commercials and videos for clients that engage viewers and has done so for many years. This fact is highlighted in the all-important hero area, which is above the fold. You can see the different types of videos he produces, as well as his personal pet project, exdirt.com, an off-roading entertainment site.

Previously, he had a very basic website just to have somewhere to show his videos, but it didn’t give the quality he desired. Using one of our basic templates that we can tweak to a client’s satisfaction, we made something that is worthy of the excellence he produces.

wordflirt portfolio vihlene.com  - Wordpress Website Makeover Customer Highlight: vihlene.com

The before and after pics are dramatic in their improvements!

Before Changes

vihlene old site - Wordpress Website Makeover Customer Highlight: vihlene.com

After Changes

A few highlights of improvements we made are

  • Beautiful but simple hero area
  • Visually appealing
  • Shrinking navigation as you scroll down
  • More detail on his various projects
  • Easy for future expansion

Don’t let your website get outdated – keep it modern and accurate so that potential customers turn into NEW customers!

WordPress Website Makeover Customer Highlight: thisisbroughtonhotels.com

Wordflirt Client

Broughton Hotels

We were excited to work on this project from broughtonHOTELS!

They wanted to capture leads directly from some promotional material sent out, so they created a new domain, thisisbroughtonhotels.com, and wanted us to do the website in 3 weeks!

And we did!

A few highlights of the design:

  • Lead capture continually visible in the design
  • A Menu that expands and shows the content when clicked
  • A cool color scheme that combines appeal with professionalism
  • A blinking scroll button, informing the visitor there is more information available
  • Multiple videos that pop up when clicked where appropriate
  • improved the look and feel to “pop” more
  • Modern design that looks well in all devices

WordPress Website Makeover Customer Highlight: briananddan.com

Wordflirt Client

Brian Bernasconi and Dan Rubnitz

We’re really proud of one of our recent web design makeover projects, briananddan.com.

Since Brian and Dan had teamed up to help people buy and sell real estate in the San Jose and Silicon Valley areas, they needed a website that reflected their combined experience and to let people know who they are. Plus, Brian had a nice design he liked; unfortunately, it was on a platform different from WordPress, limiting their flexibility.

Like most successful businesses, they wanted a great website but not the hassle of designing and maintaining it themselves. They hired the Wordflirt team, and they loved the final product!

A few highlights of improvements we made are:

  • ported the design over to a WordPress site
  • added Dan to it
  • improved the look and feel to “pop” more
  • implemented a blinking scroll button to encourage visitors to explore the site
  • improved the performance

Don’t let your website get outdated – keep it modern and accurate so that potential customers turn into NEW customers!